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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 244-247

Associated maxillofacial bone fractures with zygomatic complex fracture: experience from a tertiary referral hospital in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia


1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Najran Regional Specialty Dental Centre, Medical Village Complex, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Najran Regional Specialty Dental Centre, Medical Village Complex, Najran, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
3 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Braimah R Ramat
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Najran Regional Specialty Dental Centre, Medical City Complex, Najran, 61441
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ejs.ejs_15_18

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Background The zygoma plays a fundamental role because the underlying bony structural design directly influences the facial contour. As a result of the intimate association of the zygomatic complex (ZC) with the rest of the facial skeleton, associated maxillofacial fractures are quite common. Patients and methods All cases diagnosed with ZC fracture over a 10-year period starting from December 2002 to December 2012 at Riyadh Dental Center at King Saud Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were studied. Patient’s sex, age, etiology, and associated maxillofacial bone fracture were retrieved and recorded. Data were stored and statistically analyzed using SPSS. Results were presented as simple frequencies and percentages. Results Overall, 1487 patients presented with maxillofacial trauma and 306 cases were diagnosed with zygomatic bone fractures. There were 271 (88.6%) male patients and 35 (11.4%) female patients, with male : female ratio of 7.7 : 1. Patients in the age range of 21–30 years had the highest number of maxillofacial fracture. Ninety-six (31.4%) patients had associated maxillofacial bone fractures, whereas 231 (69.6%) patients did not have any associated fracture. Road traffic accident was the leading cause of the maxillofacial trauma [221 (72.2%)]. Mandibular fracture had the highest frequency of 35 (11.4%), whereas Le-Fort III and frontal bone fractures had the least number of cases [two (0.7%)]. Conclusion Associated maxillofacial bone fracture with ZC fracture is quite common. Efforts should be made by the attending surgeon to identify these injuries.


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