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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 219-222

Surgical site infections after breast surgery: Alexandria medical research institute hospital experience


Department of Surgery, Medical Research Institute, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Yasser Hamed
Department of Surgery, Medical Research Institute, Alexandria University, 165, Alhorreya Avenue, Hadara, 21561 Alexandria
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-1121.147592

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Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are major sources of adverse operation-related events in patients undergoing surgery and include increased morbidity, psychological trauma, additional cost, and delay of postoperative adjuvant therapies. This study aimed to identify the rate, degree, treatment, and causative organisms of SSIs after breast surgery in the hospital of Medical Research Institute, University of Alexandria. Patients and methods The study prospectively included all patients admitted during the period from February 2013 to July 2013 who were selected for breast surgery. Patients were followed up for 30 days after surgery if they had no implant and for up to 1 year if they had an implant placed during the operation. The rate, degree, treatment, and causative organisms of SSIs after breast surgery were registered. Results The study included 146 patients; SSIs were diagnosed after 17 (11.6%) operations. All patients who had SSIs after breast surgery were identified during the outpatient follow-up. Six (35.2%) of the 17 patients who had SSIs after breast surgery needed to be readmitted for management of SSIs. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (isolated from 41.2% of patients). Conclusion SSIs are important and common complications after breast surgery. They can occur after any type of breast surgery. Microbiological diagnosis is an essential tool for proper management.


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